The Tools Artists Use

Rebecca Volynsky

Posted on July 02, 2009 | Comments

Rebecca Volynsky is an artist living in Providence, Rhode Island.

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What are some of your favorite drawing tools (pens, pencils, markers, drawing tablet, all of the above)?

I prefer using Faber-Castell indian ink artist pens/markers for most of my work because they just have incredible quality, great colors, and last a super long time. I have recently purchased a few Pantone Universe markers, which are extremely permanent, and have fine line and brush tips. Yet, they are overly potent, and kind of difficult to hold due to their square shape. Micron pens and Pilot pens are another favorite of mine for tiny details (lines, triangles, etc.), as well as white gel pens. When it comes to using graphite, I tend to use lead/graphite sticks housed within a metal holder for more control. I also frequently use powdered graphite to cover larger areas, create smudges, and build upon the page.

If you have a wide collection, how do you decide on which to use on a particular drawing, project, or day?

Everything (including my media/tool choices) usually just evolves in itself. I suppose it just depends on what I am creating and what kind of effect is occurring at the time.

How do you like your color? Watercolor? Acrylics? Oil? Colored pencils? Markers?

I use a lot of Faber-Castell watercolors, in addition to Acryla gouache paints. Recently, I began working on a larger oil painting, which is very strange due to the change in media and size.

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Is there any particular type of notebook or drawing pad you prefer? Or does any scrap of decent-sized paper work in a pinch?

I work in 9.5" x 7" Moleskine sketchbooks/notebooks, as well as various scraps of paper. I'm currently working on a bookmaking project to create another sketchbook for myself. I like that it has a more DIY/hand-made feel, especially since I can make use of all the random paper just lying around.

Do you ever do any kind of post-processing (like adding color in Photoshop or similar tool) to your drawings?

No way! I am very passionate about working on everything with my very own two hands. I try not to dwell and over-analyze/work on anything too deeply, and feel like that would probably happen if I began relying on a computer to "edit" my work.

Have you ever tried a new pen (or paper, etc) from reading about it, or seeing the results in another artist's work?

A friend of mine told me about those Pantone Universe markers, and although they have a huge array of colors...I'm just not too thrilled about them. Other than that, I haven't really experimented with any new brand/company of art supplies.

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I asked about post-processing on a computer, but do you think the computer is a helpful tool for making art? Whether it's looking for inspiration online, or using it to build a weblog to promote yourself and your art, do you think a computer is necessary, helpful, or a distraction (or all of the above)?

I think it really depends on what kind of art work one creates. Corporate graphic designers tend to strictly rely on computers to make logos, etc., but I love designers that have more of a DIY/hand-made aesthetic (such as Martin Venezky). Tumblr is a great tool that I regularly use for displaying work and discovering inspiring imagery. I keep up with various art/design blogs (such as designformankind.com and booooooom.com while drinking my morning coffee, too.

Thanks Rebecca!

You can find Rebecca Volynsky online at her personal art weblog, and she has some work for sale in her Etsy shop.

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