The Tools Artists Use

Wil Freeborn

Posted on May 01, 2009 | Comments

Wil Freeborn is an interactive developer and artist living in Scotland.

wf-red-telephone-box-cowal

What are your favorite drawing tools (pens, pencils, markers, drawing tablet)?

My favourite drawing tools are Faber Castell PITT Artist pens, Pilot Super Grip pencils, Pentel brush pens and my Montblanc fountain pen.

If you have a wide collection, how do you decide on which to use on a particular drawing, project, or day?

I carry my drawing tools in a small Muji Pencil box. It means I can only carry 4 pens at a time, I like the fact that I have relatively few choices and don't really have to decide what pen to use at any time. Saying that I have tried lots of different type of pens from Rotring, Edding, Staedtler to Pigma Microns but for the moment I like drawing with brown ink as it throws the line back a bit and makes it a bit less dominant than a black line. I carry the Pentel brush pen and fountain pen as sometimes its good to have a looser approach and using a fountain pen or brush stops you be too precise and tight.

The other kit I carry around with me is another Muji Pencil box (large) in it are 2 pencils 2b and 4b, a pencil sharpener, a rubber (or for Americans an eraser) and 2 Pentel water brush pens a medium and a large. The box is padded with tissue to stop them rattling about.

All thats left is a small Winsor & Newton travel watercolour kit. I'm in the middle of trying to simplify the colours I use, but I like to replace some of the pans with colours I prefer such as Permanent Sap Green, Neural Grey, Permanent Mauve and Cerulean Blue. Typing this out I realise that maybe its colours suited to the Scotland's landscape and light?

It's all really basic. If I just want to draw on the way to work I take the small Muji box. If I want to paint I take the larger one with the watercolour set - no thinking involved at all! :)

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If you prefer pens, is there any particular brand, color, or type of ink you like best?

Apart from Faber-Castell PITT artist pens I like to use Noodler's Bulletproof ink in my fountain pen. It's a total lifesaver as you can work over the top of it with watercolour.

How do you like your color? Watercolour? Acrylics? Oil?

I use watercolour pretty much all the time in Moleskine sketchbooks. They react pretty strangely to watercolour almost repelling the paint so you have to work in washes almost scrubbing the paint into the page. From what is kind of a negative thing, I've got into painting this way and enjoy the results. So, now I'm trying to do watercolour on proper paper and finding it really difficult.

You recently posted a weblog entry with the kit you carry around. If and when you work at home, or in an office, do you use the same types of tools, or do you have a larger set of colors, pens, brushes, etc.?

Yes, I have a larger variety of brushes and pens to choose from. I also use Dr. Ph Martin inks as well they really add a vibrancy to watercolours. So if you want the reds and greens to really pop out of the page its amazing fun to try these out.

Is there any particular type of notebook or drawing pad you prefer? Or does any scrap of decent-sized paper work in a pinch?

Sorry, I'm a sucker for Moleskine sketchbooks, its a little bit embarrassing how ubiquitous they are. The fact that they are expensive is quite a good thing as you're not likely to leave them lying about, but because it takes me about a month or two to fill one they turn out to be okay value. Also I like the fact they fold flat so I draw over the two pages, its seems quite a small thing but its a rare quality in sketchbooks. Finally the proportion for the moleskine large sketch book just, well feels right.

I sound like a total fanboy!

I carry around sketchbooks around pretty much all the time, but aye if there's a scrap of paper around I'll use it.

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Do you ever do any kind of post-processing (like adding color in Photoshop or similar tool) to your drawings?

Oh, occasionally. The Moleskine paper is quite yellow. So what I generally do in Photoshop is take a colour sample of the paper colour add a new layer and fill that layer with the colour then turn this layer off. The layer with the drawing I use auto tone, colour and levels to accentuate the tone and colours, but it takes the yellow tone away. I then turn that yellow layer back on and choose "multiply" and reduce the transparency to what looks right.

Have you ever tried a new pen (or paper, etc) from reading about it, or seeing the results in another artist's work?

Yes I've tried some new Kuretake brush pens which I read about on Meg Hunt's site which have an amazing dark fluent line. I think they're for Japanese calligraphy. I just wish they weren't water soluble.

Also I've experimented with trying dip pens after an article by Kevin Cornell who recommended Hunt's Speedball #102 nibs.

Do you have anything you use out of the ordinary for making your art?

When I'm traveling abroad drawing I carry around a Fuji Pivi printer which does small polaroid type photos. Instead of carrying glue to stick all those handy exotic receipts, tickets and bags of sugar you can buy pre blobs of glue on bits of paper. I put these handy things in the back of my Moleskine.

I asked about post-processing on a computer, but do you think the computer is a helpful tool for making art? Whether it's looking for inspiration online, or using it to build a weblog to promote yourself and your art, do you think a computer is necessary, helpful, or a distraction (or all of the above)?

Yes, all of the above! I've avoided doing digital colouring deliberately. I'm not sure if I'm doing the right thing using watercolour but its something I really want to stick with as I'm really enjoying the process.

Building a web presence and finding like minds has been incredible! At the same time I need to get away from the computer and make things.

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From your CV/folio it looks like you do more web design and layout. Do you, in a way, consider that art? I certainly do, even though I'm not very good at it. I'm more on the programming side. If so, what are your common tools for web design and graphic/art layout?

I don't know if web design is art? I use Photoshop for layouts and Illustrator for more design logo work.

For so long though its been part of who I am as a designer who likes to sketch. I'm at a crossroads at the moment as I've left the BBC and I'm looking to try and spend more time doing illustration. It's a big step for me but at the moment it feels like the right thing to do.

Thanks Wil!

Wil Freeborn can be found online at his weblog, on Flickr (ghostschool), and on Twitter (@ghostschool). Wil also participated in the 6th Moleskine Exchange.

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Taylor White

Posted on April 29, 2009 | Comments

Taylor White is a commercial storyboard artist and illustrator living in Oslo, Norway.

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What are some of your favorite drawing tools (pens, pencils, markers, drawing tablet, all of the above)?

For most of my illustration projects my tool of choice vacillates between some form of graphite and ballpoint pen, but digital application of color remains a constant. I use a Wacom tablet at some stage for nearly every project, and I also add scanned textures to make things interesting. As far as sketchbooks go, I have grown particularly fond of the multi-colored ballpoint pens manufactured by Muji. The flow of ink is much smoother than many ballpoints I have tried, and I can get a lot of interesting linework with it. Plus the color options are just downright fun. I'm also hoping if I plug them in this interview, they'll send me some free pens.

If you have a wide collection, how do you decide on which to use on a particular drawing, project, or day?

Mood, mostly. It depends on the look and feel I'm going for, Although size and format of the project is a factor as well. The thing I love about the ballpoint is not only the variation of lines and gradation you can achieve, but also the spontaneity and the permanence of it. When you draw with a ballpoint you are making a commitment to the lines you put down, for better or for worse. This forces you to problem solve, to figure out how to make it work, even if you mess up. Poets Wallace Stevens and Robert Frost both believed in letting poems write themselves, and I feel similarly about drawing. So what I end up with is multiple drawings overlapping each other, reflecting the spontaneity and the changing of circumstances that occur as you draw. It ends up becoming more interesting to look at. Jeeze, that was long-winded.

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If you prefer pens, is there any particular brand, color, or type of ink you like best?

Like I said, the Muji ballpoint is a firm favorite. I also have a fondness for Prismacolor markers which is deeply rooted in my adolescence.

How do you like your color? Watercolor? Acrylics? Oil? Colored pencils? Markers?

Where illustration is concerned, my coloring is all digital. Especially since I work professionally in an office setting, digital coloring allows for minimal clutter, ease of alteration and quick results. I have a complete other method I use to make paintings, but I'll pretend for now that it isn't relevant.

Is there any particular type of notebook or drawing pad you prefer? Or does any scrap of decent-sized paper work in a pinch?

I'll hash out ideas on any surface, but generally I prefer any paper that isn't solid white. Moleskine books are preferable for me when sketching, because of the solid weight of the paper and because it's off-white. I'm also a fan of newsprint and grocery paper.

If you paint, is there any particular type of canvas you prefer? Do you like to paint on wood or any other materials?

Oh good, glad I saved talking about my painting method for this question. This may seem more relevant after I've actually displayed some of this work online (coming soon, guys) but here we go. After ages of toiling with ways to transfer my sketchbook drawings to canvas without losing its fluidity, I finally found a way to make it work by using either vine charcoal or chalk on raw cotton canvas, and then sealing it with acrylic polymer (i use plextol) to preserve the stroke. Then if I feel like it I layer oil on top to render some spots and leave others skeletal. At this point I'd like to give credit to Norwegian painter Benjamin Bergman for introducing me to this technique. Look him up, he's fantastic.

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Have you ever tried a new pen (or paper, etc) from reading about it, or seeing the results in another artist's work?

Oh of course. Almost every technique I use was lifted in part from somewhere else. I'm pretty sure there aren't many who could claim otherwise.

If you work both digitally and non-digitally, which do you find yourself doing more? Is there a reason you would prefer one of the other? Is it because of the tools available in either space?

My working environment at the agency I work for in Oslo completely influenced my decision to go almost all digital at work. I have limited space and since I am inherently untidy I prefer not to spend a whole lot of time cleaning up paint mess. If I decide to do a storyboard or a sketch non-digitally, it's pretty much only because I felt like it that day.

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I asked about post-processing on a computer, but do you think the computer is a helpful tool for making art? Whether it's looking for inspiration online, or using it to build a weblog to promote yourself and your art, do you think a computer is necessary, helpful, or a distraction (or all of the above)?

Absolutely all of the above, especially if it's hooked up to the internet. But you know what I think the computer is a fantastic tool for making art. Some say that doing work on a computer invalidates it as a legit work of art but I disagree; the computer shouldn't be looked upon so much as a crutch or an easy substitute for the pen or pencil but a way to take what we know about traditional media and expand upon it, all the while coming up with new ways to be artists. Remember even with the aid of machines we are still the ones in control of the final product. Plenty of people use a computer and still make crappy art.

Thanks Taylor!

Taylor White can be found online at her portfolio site taylor-white.com, her weblog, and on Twitter (@taylurk).

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Jana Bouc

Posted on April 27, 2009 | Comments

Jana Bouc is a painter and watercolor teacher in the San Francisco East Bay Area.

jb-stolen-roses

What are some of your favorite drawing tools (pens, pencils, markers, drawing tablet, all of the above)?

I like to draw directly in pen when sketching since it forces me to loosen up and lighten up and let things get as goofy as they often do. Or, if I want to be more accurate, drawing in ink helps me to remember to go slow and look closely at my subject.

Pencil: I'm rather fond of my Papermate Titanium .5mm mechanical pencil with built in eraser. I have a variety of drawing, drafting and mechanical pencils but I'm not too attached to any of them.

If you prefer pens, is there any particular brand, color, or type of ink you like best?

The Pigma Micron .01 black ink pen is my favorite. I like the fact that ink is permanent and waterproof and doesn't bleed or dissolve when adding watercolor the way some other "permanent" or "waterproof" inks do. I've tried many others, from fountain pens to dip pens to markers, but I always come back to my Pigma Micron.

If you have a wide collection, how do you decide on which to use on a particular drawing, project, or day?

If I'm sketching from life, I choose my Pigma Micron. If I'm sketching from my imagination I usually use a pencil since I'm not sure where I'm going and kind of sculpt the drawing from scribbles as I go.

How do you like your color? Watercolor? Acrylics? Oil? Colored pencils? Markers?

Watercolor had been my primary medium for 30 years. Then a couple years ago I tried (unsuccessfully) switching to acrylic. I just couldn't get acrylics to do what I wanted (though I will likely give them another try at some point). Then I moved on to oils and I've been studying oil painting since, while not giving up watercolor. I'm finding that some subjects look better to me in different media. For example, when I want to capture detail or delicate flowers, watercolor is my medium of choice; landscape, especially plein air, seems to call for oil painting.

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If you do use paints, inks, pencils, or markers for coloring, are there any in particular that are your favorites? Do you prefer travel sets of paints to a full set?

I have several different watercolor sets and two oil-painting setups. When I use gouache or watercolor in the studio I have two large Robert E. Wood palettes that live on a Boby tabouret beside my large drafting table. One is filled with gouache, the other with watercolor. My watercolors are a variety of artist colors mostly from Winsor & Newton and Daniel Smith, with a couple of Holbein and Schmicke colors thrown in.

When I go out to sketch in ink and wash, I carry a Winsor & Newton Artists' Watercolor Field Box Set (over the years I've replaced all the original pan paint with colors I prefer from tubes).

If I want to use gouache in the field I carry an old small, Schmincke metal folding palette (my first watercolor set) that holds 12 half pans which I've filled with mostly M. Graham and Schmincke gouache from tubes.

I have a sturdy zipper bag I got at Utrecht that's about 8x10 into which I can easily fit my entire sketching kit in (including sketchbook). The items I include in my sketching kit are:

  • Micron Pigma .01 pen (my favorite sketching pen)
  • Kuretake waterbrushes
  • Kleenex purse pack of tissues
  • Sketchbook
  • optional extras:
    • 2 oz plastic squirt bottle (optional, easier than using waterbrushes to moisten paint and good for sprizting the paper if needed)
    • 2 oz plastic bottle with extra water
    • pencil
    • kneaded eraser

If I'm doing an actual plein air painting in watercolor rather than a sketch, I have a larger, Holbein palette. Then I use a watercolor block instead of a sketchbook and carry real brushes in a canvas brush holder, still quite portable.

For oil painting in the studio I have an old Stanrite Aluminum #700 easel and for field work I use my Soltek Pro (needed the Pro's extra height because I'm tall). I'm currently using mostly Winsor & Newton oils and a few Gamblin but selecting my oil colors is still a work in progress.

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Is there any particular type of notebook or drawing pad you prefer? Or does any scrap of decent-sized paper work in a pinch?

Lately I've been using mostly Moleskine watercolor sketchbooks and Strathmore Medium Drawing spiral bound sketchbooks. In the past I was fond of the inexpensive Aquabee Super Deluxe spiral bound. I've tried many others that I didn't like for one reason or another. I recently purchased a Fabriano Venezzia bound sketchbook and am looking forward to using it next. Of course I'll draw on just about anything if no sketchbook is at hand. One of my favorite sketches was done on the back of a bag of Trader Joe's Biscottis while waiting in the checkout line.

If you paint, is there any particular type of canvas you prefer? Do you like to paint on wood or any other materials?

Yes! I've tried stretched canvas and practically every kind of painting panel there is and I LOVE Ampersand's Gessobord. I use their 1/8" flat panels because they're the least expensive, while still being "archival, museum quality."

Do you ever do any kind of post-processing (like adding color in Photoshop or similar tool) to your drawings?

I went through a phase of drawing in ink or directly on the computer using a Wacom tablet and then coloring them in Painter for creating illustrations, but didn't love spending so much time at the computer so have moved away from that for now.

I do post-processing in Photoshop when I prepare photos or scans of my artwork for my blog. Despite my care in lighting, monitor calibrating, etc., I almost always have to make some adjustments to the digital photos. I also do the same for photos I want to use for reference material.

Have you ever tried a new pen (or paper, etc) from reading about it, or seeing the results in another artist's work?

Oh yes! I'm easily seduced by glowing descriptions by other artists of their new discoveries.

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Do you have anything you use out of the ordinary for making your art?

Nope.

If you create purely-digital art, what are the software programs you use? Is one used more than another?

I was using Painter rather than Photoshop as it had more artist-friendly tools but it crashed way too often.

If you work both digitally and non-digitally, which do you find yourself doing more? Is there a reason you would prefer one of the other? Is it because of the tools available in either space?

I prefer spending less time at the computer since I have a part-time day job that requires me to be at the computer the whole time, as does blogging, and too much computer time = too many physical aches and pains.

I asked about post-processing on a computer, but do you think the computer is a helpful tool for making art? Whether it's looking for inspiration online, or using it to build a weblog to promote yourself and your art, do you think a computer is necessary, helpful, or a distraction (or all of the above)?

Yes, to all of the above.

Thanks Jana!

Jana Bouc can be found online at her website/porfolio janabouc.com, her journal and sketch weblog, and on Flickr (janabouc).

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Marina Grechanik

Posted on April 24, 2009 | Comments

Marina Grechanik is an illustrator, painter and graphic designer, born in Byelorussia, and currently living in Israel.

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What are some of your favorite drawing tools (pens, pencils, markers, drawing tablet, all of the above)?

I prefer traditional drawing tools: pens, pencils, colored pencils and markers. I'm less good with a drawing tablet, but I use it when the project calls for it. I have much respect for the simple pencil; it can be very rich and colorful in skilled hands. I also love to draw with ink because of its variable lines and spontaneity. I can't resist not mixing all those tools together.

If you have a wide collection, how do you decide on which to use on a particular drawing, project, or day?

It depends on the project, of course. Although I have periods of favorites: sometime I fall in love with colored pencils, other time I try out the set of new pens that I just bought.

If you prefer pens, is there any particular brand, color, or type of ink you like best?

I'm not a fan of a particular brand. When I'm passing by an art tools shop, I can't help not buying some new pens to try out. If there is one brand that I'm loyal to maybe it is Stabilo's pens.

How do you like your color? Watercolor? Acrylics? Oil? Colored pencils? Markers?

I love watercolor ... it's the hardest technique, because you can't undo it; but that's why it's so beautiful. Recently I'm using more and more acrylic. It's very convenient, because it dries very quickly. I don't have time for oil, but I'm still missing its smell, pace, and texture. I'm also crazy about fancy colored pencil because they remind me of kids' drawings.

If you do use paints, inks, pencils, or markers for coloring, are there any in particular that are your favorites? Do you prefer travel sets of paints to a full set?

I love my Talens Van Gogh Plastic set. It isn't too big for traveling. But usually I have limited amounts of colored pencils and pens for coloring in my bag. Sometimes the limitation is good.

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Is there any particular type of notebook or drawing pad you prefer? Or does any scrap of decent-sized paper work in a pinch?

I discovered Moleskine sketchbooks a year and half ago and since then am addicted to them. My favorite is Large Sketchbook with heavy paper, which is good with almost every tool from plain pencil to acrylic. Its paper is good with all kinds of collages that I love to paste onto my sketches like napkins from restaurants, pieces of maps, parts of packages and so on. But on the other hand I love cheaper Cahiers with which I feel freer and not afraid to spoil its pages. I'm usually carrying two or three sketchbooks in my bag. It depends on the site or how much time I have, which one I use. I also use Watercolour Large notebook for watercolors (obviously!), and I love its horizontal format. I'm participating in some moly_x - an International Moleskine Sketchbook Exchanges, for which I'm using Pocket Japanese book. It's a perfect fit for this kind of project, where several artists are continuing one other's drawing. Of course, I'm not only using Moleskine kind of sketchbooks. For example, I have various Mead sketchbooks.

I love to draw on found papers and cupboards. I have a habit of keeping papers with interesting textures, packages, wrapping paper, etc.

I use them in my works as drawing pads or part of collages.

If you paint, is there any particular type of canvas you prefer? Do you like to paint on wood or any other materials?

Similar to drawing, I have "stage fear" ... I feel freer painting on cupboards or paper. I feel obligated to a make "nice" painting when I have good quality canvas opposite me. I need to work this out, because some of my best paintings are on the poorer paper. It just seems to me fun to paint on flattened boxes, furniture and walls (in my studio and my kids' rooms).

Do you ever do any kind of post-processing (like adding color in Photoshop or similar tool) to your drawings?

I experiment on coloring and adding textures to my drawings in Photoshop. It can get cool results, but I need to be careful not to use effects too much. Sometimes I'm scanning preparation drawings for some work and playing with them in Photoshop to find the best composition, and afterwards drawing it manually.

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Have you ever tried a new pen (or paper, etc) from reading about it, or seeing the results in another artist's work?

It's always nice to discover new tools from other artists. Unfortunately here in Israel we don't have such vide varieties of brands as in the US or Europe. Many times I didn't find the specific brand that I read about at some artists' page. When I have to use the exact tool, I order it from the web.

Do you have anything you use out of the ordinary for making your art?

I always have a scrap of paper under my keyboard. After a while it fills up with very strange and interesting subconscious drawings. I'm using them in my works as kind of ideas generators.

If you create purely-digital art, what are the software programs you use? Is one used more than another?

I work in the Graphic Design and Web Design areas, so I'm friendly with Photoshop, Illustrator and Flash. I would like to increase my Illustrator skills. I love Flash for its simplicity, and many times prefer it to Illustrator for quick sketches and drawings; though, it's not proper illustration software.

If you work both digitally and non-digitally, which do you find yourself doing more? Is there a reason you would prefer one of the other? Is it because of the tools available in either space?

I work more non-digitally. Maybe I'm a little bit old fashioned and I love the feeling of the real material. Though, you can get very real feeling on today's graphic software. Of course, I don't reject digital tools, I'm using them, and they're very helpful. Maybe I'll love them more when I'll know them better.

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I asked about post-processing on a computer, but do you think the computer is a helpful tool for making art? Whether it's looking for inspiration online, or using it to build a weblog to promote yourself and your art, do you think a computer is necessary, helpful, or a distraction (or all of the above)?

As I said above, the computer is my friend. I'm using it for post-processing and also for making art from zero. But the biggest benefit the computer gives me is being a huge source of inspiration. I can't imagine working without it. It's like a part of me with all my precious bookmarks, like endless boxes of surprises. I joined Flickr a year ago, and I feel that I'm part of a community of friends interested in my art. It forces me to work more and as I have already mentioned, it's a great source for inspiration and learning from others. It allows me to participate in cool on-line projects, like Moly_x, or Urban Sketchers - another amazing web project.

Thanks Marina!

Marina Grechanik can be found online at her portfolio, on Flickr, and on Twitter (@marin71). Marina has also participated in the Moleskine Exchange exchanges #18, #29, and Portraits #1, and has contributed to Urban Sketchers.

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Frank Dormer

Posted on April 22, 2009 | Comments

Frank Dormer is an artist and children's book illustrator living in Connecticut.

fd-book-covers

What are some of your favorite drawing tools (pens, pencils, markers, drawing tablet, all of the above)?

I only use a nib pen and watercolors to create my illustrations. My nib is a Waverly nib from Edinburgh. The back of the tin has a phrase that I've never understood. 'They come as a Boon and a Blessing to men, The Pickwick, the Owl, and the Waverly Pen." Maybe your readers will know. It's the only nib I use, and found them in an art store in college 20 years ago. I've never seen them since, but the tin has over 100, so I'm set. I use whatever paper is available for sketching and figuring out layout for a book. Newsprint, copier, and trace usually.

If you have a wide collection, how do you decide on which to use on a particular drawing, project, or day?

Just the pencil and nib pen for inking.

If you prefer pens, is there any particular brand, color, or type of ink you like best?

I usually waver between Higgins Black Ink and FW Ink.

How do you like your color? Watercolor? Acrylics? Oil? Colored pencils? Markers?

I use Winsor & Newton Watercolors, usually out of the tube. I have many colors but usually use only a few.

If you do use paints, inks, pencils, or markers for coloring, are there any in particular that are your favorites? Do you prefer travel sets of paints to a full set?

The watercolors I use most are: New Gamboge, Rose Dore, Cadmium Scarlet, Burnt Sienna, Light Red, Manganese Blue, Cobalt Turquoise, and Payne's Grey. These are tubes that are squeezed into a John Pike Palette that I bought in college.

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Is there any particular type of notebook or drawing pad you prefer? Or does any scrap of decent-sized paper work in a pinch?

Any scrap of paper works for rough sketches. I use ink so some paper bleeds, but I'm usually more interested in capturing a pose or scene than how perfect it is on paper.

If you paint, is there any particular type of canvas you prefer? Do you like to paint on wood or any other materials?

Watercolor paper is used for my final art. It is usually hot press, although I have been enjoying using bristol board with watercolor. Winsor & Newton is my usual paper.

Do you ever do any kind of post-processing (like adding color in Photoshop or similar tool) to your drawings?

No.

Have you ever tried a new pen (or paper, etc) from reading about it, or seeing the results in another artist's work?

Sorry, but I am hopeless. I have been using watercolor since I was about 10, and dip pens since college (20 years ago) and don't really like to change.

Do you have anything you use out of the ordinary for making your art?

Nothing I can think of. I have, as I said before, never come across the Waverly Nib since college, and I have been in lots of art stores. So that may be out of the ordinary, I don't know.

If you create purely-digital art, what are the software programs you use? Is one used more than another?

No digital art. I use my Mac for scanning art and putting together picture book proposals.

fd-santaclaus

Do you think the computer is a helpful tool for making art? Whether it's looking for inspiration online, or using it to build a weblog to promote yourself and your art, do you think a computer is necessary, helpful, or a distraction (or all of the above)?

I see the computer for making art as a tool, like a pencil, or pastels. Some use it, some don't. I know almost all the artists I know have a computer, even if it's for building their site, or scanning art. But there are a few who still do paste-up and it works fine for them.

Thanks Frank!

You can find Frank Dormer online at his website/portfolio frankwdormer.com, and his weblog. You can find more information about the books Frank illustrated on his site, and on Amazon.com.